Migrants in New Zealand: Report shows high Retention Rates

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ReportThe Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment in New Zealand has just published a report on migrants and their mobility pattern – the research was carried out on migrants who were approved residence in New Zealand from 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2011. 

Background
  • Migration, both inwards and outwards, plays a significant role in the New Zealand labour market and economy. One in four of the New Zealand workforce was born overseas – one of the largest proportions among developed countries.
Key findings
  • High retention of permanent migrants - Of the 577,983 migrants who settled in New Zealand between 1998 and 2011 a total of 72 percent have remained in the country (while 28 percent have moved out of New Zealand for a period of six months or more).
  • The UK was one of the four top source countries for migrants to New Zealand (19 percent) and the retention rate for UK migrants was 75 percent.
  • Australia is the main destination of migrants who leave: Australia was the main destination (31 percent) while 15 percent moved to the United Kingdom. Migrants from the United Kingdom and China who left New Zealand were more likely to return to their home country rather than migrate to Australia.
  • Migrants from the United Kingdom took, on average, roughly two and a half years before moving onward.
More information and the full findings can be accessed here.

The report certainly shows that immigration doesn’t always have to be a permanent decision. Many migrants choose to leave after a period in the host country, returning home or migrating onward to another country. New Zealand is an attractive destination for many reasons: some move for the warmer weather and a better lifestyle, some want a better future for their children and others want to live in a clean and safe environment. Whatever the motivations are, New Zealand is certainly a great place to settle.

Have a look at our testimonials page to read about the experiences of our Doctors in NZ.